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Windows 10 and the stress of Windows 8

Those of you who know me or follow our company's social media may know that I had to recently purchase a new laptop and was forced into using Windows 8.    And if you look at the amount of social media and company blogs that have been written, you can tell this happened in early August since there are very few blogs and other posts.    My laptop is a vital tool for what I do.     It's like the handyman who carries a tool box - we need these tools to get the job done. Yes, we have thought of going backwards to Windows 7 since that actually worked, but the new operating system and having to reload has caused software problems.    Some stuff is missing and we can't find the disk or some crazy software company has said we could only have one install despite the fact that we purchased the program and own the darn disk.     It's nothing but nightmares.    I hate reloading the laptop, which also causes nothing but nightmares.    Yes, I can hear someone out there saying to store stuff on the cloud and use software on the cloud.     That's okay for people who don't write novels and want to protect their property and people who don't use software like Photoshop and ACAD software.    These programs need to be on the hard drive and not relying on some Internet connectivity to make it work correctly.    Work can be too easily lost.     And being an artist - we don't react well to losing hours of work and then losing the zen moment of creativity that is lost by malfunctioning tools.    Having to be connected to the Internet to do anything removes one's

Windows 8 – A danger to losing productivity

I am pretty good on a computer. I may not be an expert but I can do all the normal expected tasks on a computer that any employer would require such as using office type software, design software, browsers, adding software and hardware to a setup, and can change settings to customize the desktop for pictures, fonts, and screen sizes.   I don’t have any problems attaching files to emails and so forth and know how to update or add software like Adobe Acrobat to be able to look at pdfs files.   My first computer was an Atari with an ultra clear black and white screen with no actual hard drive.   We used the 3.5 floppy disks with software on them and relied on the ram D drive, which was like virtual or cache memory.   This all sounds very primitive now, but it was amazing to have for writing college papers and my own personal manuscripts.   I played a few games, but the computer was a vital tool for me for my education and my creative outlet, which was writing. Now I am faced with an unpleasant situation.   I have this beautiful Lenovo Ultrabook that is an i7, but I can barely make it work for the things I need to do.   I just got through having a Toshibi i7 that came with a faulty keyboard and a used hard drive, and no, it was not refurbished but brand new.   This last Toshiba was also the cause for the NetObjects software to not run correctly nor the Wacom tablet, and countless other odd problems that I have had to endure over the past years.   So I decided to never buy a Toshiba laptop ever again after

Jelastic – The Most interesting Developer

Being the person in charge of the social media is often time consuming especially when one starts surfing through the web getting caught up in other people's social media.  It was a couple of months ago that I found myself caught up in a Tweet from Jelastic.  It was basically an invitation to help them find the world's most interesting software developer.  And my mind started buzzing with the fact that our Bill Sikkens was a pretty interesting and unusual software programmer with a very wide background of experiences and interests.  So I courageously dived in with the notion that my friend should be the most interesting developer in the world! Okay, maybe I am getting carried away here, but he does have a pretty interesting background and knowledge base.  So I wrote up a quick submission to Jelastic and warned Bill of my submission for him to be considered.  And guess what? He has been named one of the Most Interesting Developers for the month of August.  To read their article about him just follow the link below. http://blog.jelastic.com/2014/09/09/meet-william-sikkens-one-of-augusts-most-interesting-developers/ Who knows where this will lead, but it has been good fun while getting caught up in the wave of social media.

Printable Coverings using Camouflage Algorithms

Lots of interesting technology and science coming out of MIT these days and I just could not resist sharing it. It appears, or perhaps that is not the correct word for this article, that a team of students are working on creating an algorithms that will make it possible to print out a covering that will assist in the camouflage of stationary objects. I can just see the military getting excited about this one and wanting to put it on top of their buildings that need to remain hidden. Now my first reaction to this article is what exactly is an algorithm? I know it is something our Technology Expert, Bill Sikkens, always refers to, but what exactly is it? According to wikipedia “an algorithm is a step-by-step procedure for calculations. Algorithms are used for calculation, data processing, and automated reasoning.” So this team of MIT students are creating a procedure for a software to select the best choices of color and gradient to make a stationary item seem to disappear from view. What a really cool idea! Now of course the art of camouflage has been around for a long time and is used mostly in military situations and are evident in the painting of tanks, airplanes, uniforms, and netting used to hide bases and so forth. But it is also used in civilian applications as well. First World War German Fokker DVII biplane using camouflage pattern. How many people have seen the strange cell towers that look like trees? I have seen a number of these and I actually kinda like them. I appreciate the effort to make them look less like a blight on the landscape – especially in areas

By |June 12th, 2014|Categories: Software Development, Technology|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , |Comments Off on Printable Coverings using Camouflage Algorithms

Custom Software Solution

So why should anyone consider a custom software solution when the market place has so many of the “in the box” software applications that might solve their business software needs? This question has been pondered, no doubt, countless times in boardroom meetings and planning sessions amongst professional teams. Old and long trusted responses have been that custom software is too expensive, not necessary, or that a box software solution will work for awhile and then one can always upgrade. And then the final nail in the coffin on this discussion would be that if custom software was decided upon – who would write it? Great reason for a custom software solution. So custom software is too expensive – is that really true? In some cases custom software may indeed be very expensive, after all the software has to be designed, coded, and then debugged. And the initial cost and effort may seem daunting to some boardroom committees that may baulk at the prospect of bringing such a request to the finance department. But is the custom software solution really more expensive in the long run? How will custom software affect the company in the years to come? Will productivity go up because employees are no longer wasting time fighting with in box solutions that may require extra steps and time? Giving company professionals time to be creative or allowing them to focus on what they are really good at instead of fighting software systems that don’t compliment the company’s focus can prove to be very beneficial. Survival of a business requires the leadership to look at the so called “big picture” and see if one aspect of a company’s infrastructure can change productivity.