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Your Home Router may be the Next Target

Read Kim Komando's article about router security. The bad guys don't even have to show up at your house anymore to get in and rob you.  Who are these fantastic sounding criminals?  They are hackers, and they are using your everyday appliances to get into your personal space and steal vital data from you or perhaps just use your location for their crime.  And apparently your home router is letting these guys in through various back doors! This is important stuff because no one wants to be violated, victimized, or unwittingly be the site for ongoing criminal activity that hurts others.  The damage can be expensive and very stressful, and that is why we want to make sure that our Team Members and clients all are made aware of what is going on.  This is the first part of winning this battle.  Knowing that it is possible to be hacked and learning measures to prevent these events from happening is the first vital step to securing your home router. So that's why we are sharing this article on how hackers are targeting your personal router and the steps to help prevent such an intrusion into your private space.  Just click the link to read more. http://www.foxnews.com/tech/2014/03/15/hackers-now-targeting-your-router/?intcmp=features

By |March 17th, 2014|Categories: Data Storage, HIPAA, Privacy, Security, Technology|Tags: , , , , , , , |Comments Off on Your Home Router may be the Next Target

Cyber theft: First three weeks of February – 360 million stolen and abused credentials

Is your data secure? Are you HIPAA compliant? The amount of data theft is rising, or at least it is becoming more public.  Either way, the security concern over keeping your personal data as well as your company's data is now even more vital since cyber criminals are starting to discover that these databases are hackable.  Just recently one of our own clients had a cyber attack upon his business, and the only reason why his vital data was not stolen was that a proper firewall had just been installed.  If you are considering a software security upgrade, now is the time to do so.  Most especially if you are part of the medical, banking, or even retail industry.  Cyber theft is a reality that you cannot afford to ignore. Here is another article from the BBC that is worth reading. http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-26351123

By |February 26th, 2014|Categories: Data Storage, HIPAA, Privacy, Security, Technology|Tags: , , , , , , , , |Comments Off on Cyber theft: First three weeks of February – 360 million stolen and abused credentials

HIPAA HITECH

Cumulus is ready to certify you on HIPAA HITECH (Also known as HIPAA 2.0). You needed to be compliant by September 23, 2013. So did your vendors. Let us help you avoid the fine! What Exactly is HIPAA? HIPAA, short for the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act, is a set of regulations first introduced in 1996 that regulate how electronic health records are handled by medical providers and medical billing companies. The new HIPAA HITECH introduces new regulations and clarifies some of the previous areas where exact implementation was hard to understand. One new area that HIPAA HITECH covers is that the vendors (entities that maintain, store or handle protected electronic health information) can also be fined along with their covered entities if they fail to meet HIPAA requirements.  In plain words - the computer guy that certified the doctor as being HIPAA certified can also get in trouble if the requirements are not met. How bad are the fines? Violations of HIPAA can incur very steep fines as well as, in some cases, criminal charges. The average fine can be around $25,000 - $50,000 per incident per provider. So if there is a medical provider with 3 doctors and protected electronic information is not handled correctly, a fine of $150,000 may be assessed.  This is the kind of fine that any small or medium sized business cannot afford to ignore let alone the original reasons why such regulations were made to protect confidentiality. Are there solutions? Cumulus specializes in HIPAA compliant medical software. We are a provider of HIPAA compliant cloud services for hosting of servers, databases and other information systems of protected data. In addition we offer on-site and server analysis to

Privacy Concerns and Smartphones

The following information is from www.privacyrights.org and contains a lot of good information regarding protection of personal information on smart phones. 1. Introduction A smartphone is a small handheld electronic device that has features of both a mobile phone and a computer. Smartphones allow us to communicate via talk, text and video; access personal and work e-mail; access the Internet; make purchases; manage bank accounts; take pictures and do many other activities.  They are becoming capable of doing more and more every day. Clunky, expensive versions of smartphones have been around since as early as 1992, but it wasn’t until Apple released the iPhone in 2007 that smartphones reached the mass market. According to a June 2013 Pew Internet Report, 56% of American adults have a smartphone. In fact, smartphone users now outnumber traditional mobile phone users. While they provide us with seemingly unlimited amounts of useful tools, most of us don’t consider the massive amount of personal data that we carry around in our smartphones. Unlike many of our computers, our smartphones are always with us and many of us rarely turn them off.  Despite the amount we use them and the dependence we place on our smartphones, a 2012 study found that 62% of smartphone users do not password protect their phone and that smartphone users are 33% more likely to become a victim of identity theft than non-users. In this Fact Sheet, we explain the privacy implications of smartphones and offer practical tips to protect your privacy. 2. What is your smartphone capable of revealing about you? It’s safe to assume that anything you do on your smartphone and any information you store is at risk of being snooped on if you

License Plates, Cameras, and Our Vanishing Privacy

(From IEEE Spectrum, 20 December 2012) Steven Cherry: Hi, this is Steven Cherry for IEEE Spectrum’s “Techwise Conversations.” Last year we did several shows about GPS tracking of automobiles, that is, whether the police can attach a tracking device to a suspect’s car, and do they need a warrant for that. As it turns out, that question is almost irrelevant, quaint, even. Today the police have a wide variety of ways to track us, none of which involve actually touching your car. The latest and most disturbing development is the way law enforcement officials can use license plate information culled from video cameras—a practice that turns out to be vastly more common than you might think, because there are way more video cameras photographing license plates than you probably thought. Besides fixed cameras, such as at traffic lights, cops themselves are wielding recording equipment optimized for reading license plates. According to an article in The Wall Street Journal, a study by the Center for Evidence-Based Crime Policy found that “37 percent of large police departments were using [license] plate readers.” At just one of them, the Riverside County Sheriff's Department in California, 49 camera-equipped vehicles took 6 million scans, recording a total of 2 million unique license plates over a two-year period that ended this August. And it’s not just the government. The Wall Street Journal article described vast databases of hundreds of millions of license plate scans by private companies. It cited a single auto repossession agency in Baltimore, whose agents—repo men, as they’re popularly called—scan over 10 million plates each year now. There’s a wide variety of other technologies now being employed by law enforcement: radioactivity detectors, automotive black boxes, navigation systems, automated

By |December 23rd, 2012|Categories: Privacy|Comments Off on License Plates, Cameras, and Our Vanishing Privacy